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OCEANOGRAPHY (130)


    SYLLABI
         Tues/Thurs 7:30-9am

    ASSIGNMENTS
          Assign. #1
          Assign. #2
          Assign. #3
          Assign. #4
          Assign. #5
          

    STUDY QUESTIONS
          Exam #1
          Exam #2
          Exam #3
          Exam #4    

    OCEAN NEWS LINKS
          Ocean.com
          Seaweb
          Underwater Times

    PRACTICE QUIZZES

    EXTRA CREDIT

         

 

Introduction to Oceanography (ES 130F)
Fullerton College: Fall 2011

Instructor: Robert Ellis                                                                     CRN 10212
Email: rellis@fullcoll.edu                                          Tues/Thurs 7:30 –8:50am
Website: http://staffwww.fullcoll.edu/rellis                                        Room 412
Course Content: http://distanceed.fullcoll.edu

1. GENERAL INFORMATION
Course Synopsis: This course equates to three (3) lecture hours per week. It explores geological, physical, chemical and biological processes in the world ocean and their interactions with the Earth system. A primary emphasis of this course is to develop science literacy through a study of the world ocean. The relevance of oceanography to issues of human and social significance will also be emphasized.

According to college guidelines, a student should expect to spend at least nine (9) hours per week studying for a 3-unit course during a 17.5-week semester. Students are urged to review the suggestions provided in the FC Course Catalog concerning workload and class load. Failure to properly budget your time may severely hamper your success in this course.

2. COURSE GOALS
By the end of this course, I hope that you will have achieved the following:

  • A greater interest in the oceans
  • a familiarity with basic terminology and descriptions of materials and processes in the subdisciplines of geological, physical, chemical and biological oceanography
  • an appreciation of the importance of the world ocean to our planet
  • a healthy skepticism of facts and an appreciation for where knowledge comes from
  • a desire to better protect the oceans through active involvement with government and environmental organizations.

3. TEXTBOOK REQUIREMENTS & OFFICE HOURS
Exploring the World Ocean by W. Sean Chamberlin and Tommy Dickey
-We rely heavily on this textbook and not having it will put you at a significant disadvantage.
   
Office Hours
I will show up to class early and often stay after many classes to answer any question or concerns that you may have. I will also be available at other times during the week by appointment.

4. ASSESSMENTS
Homework Assignments
Five assignments will be given over the course of the semester. Assignments will be described in class and posted at http://distanceed.fullcoll.edu. You will need to sign up for a FC Blackboard Account to access course information. Guidelines to help you sign up and login are posted at http://staffwww.fullcoll.edu/rellis. If you need assistance logging in or have computer related issues, contact the Fullerton College Help Desk at 714-992-7111 or helpdesk@fullcoll.edu.

In addition to the five coursework assignments offered this semester, there will 15 current events assignments required. Important events related to the oceans occur everyday and are rarely covered by the national media. It is important for every oceanography student to be able to talk intelligibly about the current state of ocean science, policy, and conservation. Therefore, you will need to write a ½ - 1 page summary of your article as well as your opinion of the issue and how it relates to class. You may use any reputable source of news but must turn in a copy of the article that you are summarizing with your assignment. The summary must be written in your own words to get credit. In addition to newspapers and scientific journals, some common places to find ocean-based news are:

Assignments will be collected at the beginning of class and will not be accepted afterwards to encourage class punctuality. If you are going to miss class that week, you must give your homework to another student to turn in for you. Emailed assignments are only accepted if you give me previous notification/reason and they are turned in before class begins. No late assignments will be accepted under any circumstances.

There is a NO tolerance policy for cheating of any kind in this class. Plagiarizing other students’ assignments or copying directly from a website, textbook or handout will result in an automatic zero on the assignment and possible expulsion from the class. Working with other students on homework assignments is allowed, but each student must turn in work that is written in their own words (see Fullerton College Catalog for definition under Academic Honesty).

Exams
Four (4) on-campus exams will be given this semester for a total of 300 points. You have two options to help you get the highest collective exam score possible.

  • Three midterm exams will be offered worth 100 points each for a total of 300 points. They will each only cover only one particular section of the course. You will have 90 minutes to complete the exams.
  • The final will be cumulative and consist of questions from each of the three midterms as well as some from the final section of the course. You will have the entire last class to take this exam and it will be worth 300 points.

Of these two 300 point options, you highest score will automatically be added to your homework assignment total to generate your final total points. No makeup exams will be given. Therefore, if you must miss a midterm, your final will automatically be taken for your exam total. All exam questions come from the textbook, lectures, assignments, and assigned supplemental materials. Exams may consist of multiple choice, short answer, drawing/fill in the blank, or essay questions. All exams are closed book and closed notes.

Coursework Assignments (5 assignments at 25 points each) =   125 points
Current Event Assignments (15 assignments at 5 points each) =   75 points
Exams (3 midterms at 100 pts each OR the final for 300 pts) =    300 points
Total =                                                                                                   500 points

Grading

A = 450 – 500 points          C = 350 – 399 points          F = <299 or fewer points
B = 400 – 449 points          D = 300 – 349 points

Class participation is a very important part of this course and will be taken into account for borderline grades, both up or down.

5. CLASS SCHEDULE
This schedule is subject to (and probably will) change. Certain topics may be added, or switched around due to the occurrence of related current events that I feel are important to cover. Changes will be discussed in class and it is your responsibility to keep track of these changes. Missing class when a due date is changed is NOT an excuse for missing that assignment.

Date

Topic

Reading

Assignment Due

Exams

1

8/16

Course guidelines / Introduction

Syllabus

.

.

 

8/18

Importance of the oceans

Chapter 1

.

.

2

8/23

Solar system, planetary & ocean origins

Chapter 2

Current Event #1

.

 

8/25

Solar system, planetary & ocean origins (cont.)

Chapter 2 (cont.)

.

.

3

8/30

Plate tectonics theory and evidence

Chapter 3

Current Event #2

.

 

9/1

Plate tectonics theory and evidence (cont.)

Chapter 3 (cont.)

.

.

4

9/6

Seafloor features

Chapter 4

Current Event #3

.

 

9/8

Ocean sediments

Chapter 5

Assignment #1

.

5

9/13

Exam #1

.

Current Event #4

EXAM 1: Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

 

9/15

Chemistry and physical properties of seawater

Chapter 6

.

.

6

9/20

Ocean physics- heat, temperature light, and color

Chapter 7

Current Event #5

.

 

9/22

Ocean physics (cont.)

Chapter 7 (cont.)

.

.

7

9/27

Ocean-Atmospheric interactions

Chapter 8

Current Event #6

.

 

9/29

Global climate change

Chapter 8 (cont.)

.

.

8

10/4

Surface circulation

Chapter 9

Current Event #7

.

 

10/6

Deep circulation in the world ocean

Chapter 9 (cont.)

Assignment #2

.

9

10/11

Exam #2

.

Current Event #8

EXAM 2: Chapters 6, 7, 8, 9

 

10/13

Waves and surf

Chapter 10

.

.

10

10/18

Extreme waves

Chapter 10 (cont.)

Current Event #9

.

 

10/20

The highs and lows of tides / Dynamic tides and sea level

Chapter 11

.

.

11

10/25

Coastal ecosystems

Chapter 15

Current Event #10

.

 

10/27

Beaches and the forces that shape them

Chapter 15

Assignment #3

.

12

11/1

Evolution of life

Chapter 12

Current Event #11

.

 

11/3

Marine habitats and organisms

Chapter 12 (cont.)

.

.

13

11/8

Exam #3

.

Current Event #12

EXAM 3: Chapters 10, 11, 15, 12

 

11/10

Global primary production / Ocean food webs

Chapter 13 & 14

.

.

14

11/15

Marine animals (Natural history and current status)

TBA

Current Event #13

.

 

11/17

Marine animals (cont.)

TBA

Assignment #4

.

15

11/22

Marine conservation (Economics, law and policy)

TBA

Current Event #14

 .

11/24

Thanksgiving: No Class

16

11/29

Marine conservation (cont.)

Chapter 16

Current Event #15

.

12/1

Current issues / Future explorations

Chapter 16 (cont.)

Assignment #5

.

17

12/6

Review

.

.

.

12/8

Final Exam (Cumulative)
7:00 – 8:50am

.

.

EXAM 4: Ch. 13, 14, 16, Cumulative

“How inappropriate to call this planet 'Earth', when it is clearly 'Ocean'.”
--Arthur C. Clarke