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Local Birds 

 

Red Tail Hawk
red tail hawk
What they eat Rodents, rabbitts, quail, snakes, lizards
How they get food Circular soaring at medium altitude. Attack by high speed, shallow angle descent striking prey 1/4 mile away or farther.

 

Red Shouldered Hawk
red shouldered hawk
What they eat Small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, small birds and large insects.
How they get food Aggressive flight with intermittent soaring. They swoop down on prey at a steep angle and at high speed, capturing them with their talons.

 

Osprey
osprey
What they eat Fish, usually in coastal marine environments.
How they get food Linear soaring at medium altitude above water punctuated with intermittent hovering (kiting). Plunges nearly straight down, feet first into water, grabbing fish in talons.

 

Cooper's Hawk
cooper's hawk
What they eat Small and medium-sized birds.
How they get food They fly very aggressively at high speed and low altitude through woodlands and forests, surprising their prey which they capture with their talons.

 

American Kestrel
American Kestrel
What they eat Small rodents, lizards, grasshoppers, dragonflies, carpenter bees and an occasional small bird (hence the name, sparrowhawk)
How they get food Launching from a high perch, the kestrel patrols at moderate speed and low altitude over open terrain. Kestrels snag flying insects at speed with talons and consume them on-the-wing. When searching for ground prey, kestrels will hover in-place and then descend in stages, feet-first, to the ground.

 

Peregrine Falcon
Peregrine Falcon
What they eat Medium-sized birds such as doves, pigeons, and small   ducks
How they get food Peregrines soar at medium-to-high altitudes over relatively open terrain. They dive at speeds of 185 mph or faster, striking the wing of its prey with its fisted talons.

 

Turkey Vulture
turkey vulture
What they eat All kinds of recently dead animals (carrion) including small mammals, deer and cattle.
How they get food Turkey vultures spend the greatest portion of their day soaring over open terrain. They hold their wings in a 'V' pattern and hardly ever flap-fly. Once a carcas is located, they simply land and begin to feed -- if there are no other claimants such as bears, dogs, foxes or coyotes. Because of their large size, turkey vultures can "gang up" on a smaller predator and intimidate them away from their kill.

 

California Brown Pelican
California Brown Pelican
What they eat Marine fish
How they get food Pelicans flap-fly in a linear direction, 50-100 feet above coastal marine waters searching the waters below for fish. They dive head-first into water. On contact, they open their beak, capturing the fish in the expanded pouch of the lower beak.

 

Black Phoebe
black phoebe
What they eat Flying insects
How they get food The black phoebe pops up from low perches to quickly intercept a nearby flying insect with its beak, returning immediately to its perch. This cycle is repeated many times during the day.

 

Acorn Woodpecker
acorn woodpecker
What they eat Mostly acorns, and some insects.
How they get food Acorn woodpeckers create acorn-sized holes in the trunks of local trees in preparation for acorn storage. Acorn woodpeckers collect fallen acorns and stuff them into these holes. When hungry at a later time, the visible acorns are easily found, removed and consumed.

 

Northern Mockingbird
northern mockingbird
What they eat Crawling insects
How they get food They patrol mostly within trees, and capture crawling insects with their beak.

 

Scrub Jay
scrub jay
What they eat Crawling insects, acorns
How they get food They patrol mostly within trees, and capture crawling insects with their beak. In oak woodlands or chaparral, scrub jays will eat acrons. When acorns are plentiful, scrub jays are known to bury acorns in small groups, apparently for later consumption.

 

Anna's Humingbird
Anna's hummingbird
What they eat Crawling insects, nectar.
How they get food Hummingbirds hover while recovering nectar from deep within long flowers. Hummingbirds obtain additional nutrients by eating tiny, crawling insects in bushes and trees.

 

American Crow
American Crow
What they eat Nearly anything edible that they can fit into their mouth. Scavengers, seed-eathers, and occasional predators of insects, and small mammals -- if the opportunity presents itself.
How they get food Crows usually patrol on the ground in groups in search of anything edible.

 

Common Raven
common raven
What they eat Nearly anything edible that they can fit into their mouth. Scavengers and occasional predators of insects, bird eggs, hatchlings and small mammals -- if the opportunity presents itself.
How they get food Ravens patrol the ground for edible items. In spring, they search for bird nests and consume eggs or hatchlings.

 

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